This Year and Always – Museums and Social Justice

December 21, 2015 at 3:32 pm Leave a comment

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Carrie Mae Weems, Fresh Talk for Change program, National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington D.C., November 2015

So many things have happened this year. Between working as a curatorial fellow, writing my dissertation, participating in various arts activist groups, presenting research, facilitating a Black Lives Matter teach-in and a workshop on the role of race in the arts, and healing from a series of accidents, there has been almost no time to blog. But as I catch some moments to reflect, I want to reignite this space because it’s an important way to share what I’m experiencing and find others who are committed to the arts activism.

Through this year’s activities I’ve found support in the #museumsrespondtoferguson initiative which started in response to the December 2014 Joint Statement from Museum Bloggers and Colleagues on Ferguson and Related Events. After reading this call for action, I dedicated time to participating in the monthly #museumsrespondtoferguson online discussions that Aleia Brown and Adrianne Russell have organized on Twitter. Through these conversations and my recent experiences involving leading workshops and developing museum programming centered on black protest art, I’ve learned that we all need deeper engagement with critical race theory.

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Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties, Brooklyn Museum of Art, 2014

Over the past six years, I have witnessed uncertainty and fear in several art museum professionals and students when discussing race. In addition to not wanting to feel “uncomfortable,” people worry that they will say something insensitive or that museum visitors and donors will find attention to this major social phenomenon too controversial or political. Perhaps even more troubling,  I’ve noticed that many art museum professionals act as if race is only a factor when works involves artists of color or depictions of people of color. Also there is little uproar about the scarcity of diversity within art museums. This climate has encouraged me to concentrate my efforts in making art museums more inclusive spaces that critically engage with race and intersecting issues such as of class, gender, and ability.

At present I have three key projects centered on inclusion and critical race theory in the arts.

  • First, the conversations on #museumsrespondtoferguson and other social media collaborations such as the #CharlestonSyllabus encouraged me to initiate the Social Justice and Museums Resource List. This open GoogleDoc that features discussions, readings, digital initiatives, and other resources welcomes contributions from museum professionals, theorists, artists, and students. So far I’ve mentioned it mainly to colleagues within the #museumsrespondtoferguson network and my friends and followers on Twitter and Facebook. To broaden its effectiveness, I need to reach out to museum studies, art history, and public history programs across the U.S. and abroad.
  • Second, I’m in the initial stages of developing a critical race theory toolkit for art museum curators and educators. I envision that this how-to guide will feature case studies and interviews. My goal centers on showing how race operates within the various facets of artistic production, instruction, exhibition, collection, and interpretation. As this study includes art made by artists who aren’t people of color and works that do not contain representations of people of color, it will extend the field that notable authors such as Bridget R. Cooks, Exhibiting Blackness: African Americans and the American Art Museum and Jennifer A. Gonzalez, Subject to Display: Reframing Race in Contemporary Installation Art, have forged. The innovative exhibition Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties curated by Teresa A. Carbone and Professor Kellie Jones is a significant model.
  • Lastly, I’m focusing on making the art museum workforce more diverse. I intend to coordinate outreach sessions that put museum professionals of color in touch with middle-school and high-school students. I’m looking forward to working through the details and building a coalition of museum collaborators to make this come alive in the near future.

And at some point soon I will finish writing my dissertation!
Yes, the new year will be a busy one. That’s a very good thing.

 

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Entry filed under: Art, Museums, Social Justice. Tags: , , , , , .

My Art Museum Mission Actualizing Plans- My Program on Black Protest Art Comes to Life

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